The Origin of Civilisation and Religion

Update:

What I am trying to put across is that there is no such thing as God. It is the mind that has created God out of fear. Fear is passed on from generation to generation. What is there is fear, not God. If you are lucky enough to be free from fear, then there is no God. 

There is no ultimate reality, no God — nothing. Fear itself is the problem, not “God”. 

UG Krishnamurti

(Excerpts from book: Mind Is A Myth; page: 31)

So now we have ‘Climate Anxiety Counselling’ to contend with, according to Mhehed Zherting (H/T Anthony Watts), though if you follow the links etc, don’t be surprised if you get a little confused, as I became when I did the same. And it reminded me of a theory, put forward by Prof Gunnar Heinsohn decades ago, to explain the appearance of civilisation, and thus religion, as the human reaction to the Bronze Age global catastrophes.

This paper tries to prove the basic correctness of earliest cuneiform sources which explicitly state that the first “cult places” with their priestly personnel were established to give “counselling” to people who were left “beclouded” after a “flood had swept over the earth.” Source

But in the case here we are dealing with counselling before the advent of the expected global disaster.

The overall theorem that I use as a working hypothesis is that in the dim, dim past humanity existed as one of many animal species living in a lush tropical climate on an earlier Earth; the period known as The Garden of Eden where humans, perhaps as hairless monkeys, lived simply off the abundant fruit and nuts. Then humanity was uncivilised, animal, and only needed to forage, as people still do in the tropical rainforests of today, as small family/tribal units.

Then out of the blue a collossal global catastrophe occurred, destroying most of the Garden of Eden, profoundly affecting the biosphere, especially the primitive humans who now had to suddenly hunt and gather food in order to remain alive; no more lolling around in paradise picking fruit and nuts off abundant trees.

Humanity had entered the Stone Age.

This developed slowly into, grossly simplifing here, the Bronze Age which experienced again another global catastrophe from which, inter alia, Heinsohn’s narratives take over.

The counselling of the traumatised survivors marked the appearance of religion, in this case the Pagan ones, which focussed on the immediate causes of humanity’s angst, the planets/comets and the destruction these external agencies caused on the Earth. Heinsohn explains:

Counselling, indeed, meant that the therapeutic capacities of a child’s play were used to heal entire communities. The confused survivors were assigned roles in which not only the disturbing behaviour of man under the impact of cataclysms but also the catastrophic cosmic agents themselves were re enacted. The scene of ‘cosmic’ clashes ended in the spilling of blood and the killing of at least one contender. In this gruesome act the tense aggression – bottled up in the helpless survivors – was released in one dramatic and cathartic shot Reconciliatory acts in front of the corpses of the victims required their elevation. Bowing and asking forgiveness before the natural agents who had acquired the human or animal shape of their skilled impersonators constituted the worship of–freshly slaughtered–idols. After the gradual abandonment of blood sacrifice in the Iron Age, which was no longer struck by cosmic cataclysm, they were replaced by their portraits in wood, bone or stone giving shape to the typical statuary gods of high religion.

The Bronze Age was terminated by a further catastrophe, heralding in the Iron Age (Roman) which itself was again terminated by another catstrophe, tentatively the Pleistocene Event, ushering in the Early Middle Ages to our present times.

What has not been placated is the suppressed fear, on a global racial scale, of a future catastrophe affecting humanity, expressed via  the various millennial movements, whether the Second Coming, the Messiah, the Mahdi, or in the secular world, the anticipation of utopia and paradise after a revolutiopnary cleansing of the ‘sinners’ after the CO2 catastrophe.

It is the memory of a past paradise that drives the present generation to emulate the past by its longing for a future paradise expressed as life after death, reincarnation, or materialistic utopia in the here and now.

Scientifically it’s the case of primitive man acquiring memory which with the passage of time, together with additional catastrophes, evolved into thinking with the creation of the Ego, and its delusional world that is mistaken for reality, along with langauges and all the other Ego fabricated divisions that have plagued humanity since.

So it’s not surprising that some people start creating conselling services as they try to come to grips with the suppressed memories of the past. The fear of catastrophe is real but as Velikovsky kept pointing out, it’s the global suppression of those past species-level traumas that are causing our present day political difficulties.

The current situation is complex but most of civilised humanity has retreated into various belief systems ruled by the Ego that is confused for reality. The religions then focus on ensuring the Ego survives on the physical death of the organism, whether in a utopia in the here and now, or in the afterlife, not realising, or perhaps dimly realising, we have become disconnected from physical reality by retreating into our delusional, Ego-created, thought worlds.

It is the denial of our animal origins and behaviour that causes us consternation with the exploding human population, a natural feedback mechanism to ensure that sufficient individuals will survive the next catastrophe to repopulate the new Earth.

The real climate deniers are those who remain trapped in their theological and secular religions, and thus anticipate another climate armageddon as prophesied by our scientologists in the new churches of academe when they ardently interpret the outputs of the various computer climate models.

About Louis Hissink

Retired diamond exploration geologist. I spent my professional life looking for mineral deposits, found some, and also located a number of kimberlites in NSW and Western Australia. Exploration geology is the closest one can get to practicing the scientific method, mineral exploration always being concerned with finding anomalous geophysical or geochemical data, framing a model and explanation for the anomaly and then testing it with drilling or excavation. All scientific theories are ultimately false since they invariably involved explaining something with incomplete extant knowledge. Since no one is omniscient or knows everything, so too scientific theories which are solely limited to existing knowledge. Because the future always yields new data, scientific theories must change to be compatible with the new data. Thus a true scientist is never in love with any particular theory, always knowing that when the facts change, so too must he/she change their minds.
This entry was posted in Archaeology, Catastrophism, Climate Change and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s