Gravity

Total silence on the drill-hole gravity problem described at Malaga Bay. Obviously the gravitationalists are stumped.

About Louis Hissink

Retired diamond exploration geologist. I spent my professional life looking for mineral deposits, found some, and also located a number of kimberlites in NSW and Western Australia. Exploration geology is the closest one can get to practicing the scientific method, mineral exploration always being concerned with finding anomalous geophysical or geochemical data, framing a model and explanation for the anomaly and then testing it with drilling or excavation. All scientific theories are ultimately false since they invariably involved explaining something with incomplete extant knowledge. Since no one is omniscient or knows everything, so too scientific theories which are solely limited to existing knowledge. Because the future always yields new data, scientific theories must change to be compatible with the new data. Thus a true scientist is never in love with any particular theory, always knowing that when the facts change, so too must he/she change their minds.
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5 Responses to Gravity

  1. Edward says:

    A very interesting hypothesis Louis.

    My question would be how would one construct a large scale experiment to produce the optimal environment capable of isolating, controlling and quantifying all suspected variables in order to see just what the heck is going on.

    That and would it be possible to go back to flush the bentonite out and repeat the procedure utilizing continuous logging?

    Like

    • Impossible to return to the drilled holes – the Telyagal hole was cemented and a xmas tree put on it to control the artesian water for irrigation. And in this hole we never ever use down hole surveys, hole deflection at the diameter used and depth reached (130m) is a non-issue.

      The other 3 holes are all sealed and capped as a result of regulatory requirements, so no go there either. I do know that after the first hole with the weird results, my drillers repeated the phenomena in the next two holes, so instrument failure it could not have been.

      It was pure luck that I was supervising the drilling and not someone else. Anyone else would have dismissed the results as “errors” and thought nothing further.

      I am making progress on the theoretical assumptions, however, and it’s useful to revisit the Cavendish experiment.

      But at present I’ve got the flue (grand nieces and nephews sharing their bugs from the big smoke that is Sydney) so my attention span is off beam.

      Like

      • Edward says:

        Louis,

        After watching the Wallace Thornton video below again there is something I would like to to you to take a look at without posting.

        Like

  2. johnm33 says:

    Have you seen this from Wal Thornhill, skip to 38min to see if you’re interested. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkWiBxWieQU
    Earlier he does mention mine and altitude anomolies.

    Like

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